Fall Reading

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In case you’re wondering where my newer posts are, I’m continuing to write for Actionable Conversations. It’s awesome to have a real, live editor and get feedback on what I write–and know that by the time you read my posts, they are better thought out, better written, and better formatted than what I could do on my own. Appreciating the power of partnership!

Here’s are brief descriptions and links to my last few posts:

Most recently, I wrote about distractions in a post called Taming the Distraction Habit, This is a very personal one–and also–I hope, one that will hit home for many of you. How do we stay focused even when there is so very much (especially in our digital lives) to distract us?

In my post on vertical development, I distinguish between developing our capacity as human beings and our leadership skills. This piece draws on adult development theory as a framework for understanding the trajectory of our growth throughout our lives.

After reading Mastering Civility by Christine Porath, I reached out to the author and wrote about our conversation in a post titled In the Face of Incivility: Thrive. Rarely have I written about something more relevant to our current political reality–which I think has spread into our lives in ways that we all need to pay attention to.

I wrote a couple posts that were focused on what leaders can learn from neuroscience I summarize ten years of reading and thinking about this topic in a post called Your Brain at Work: Managing Change by Managing Your Brain. I conclude that our brains are uniquely unsuited to the lives we lead–and that there is something we can do about it. I also draw on neuroscience research in a post on creating insights–and how we can create environments that are better suited for generating insight and innovation.

Last, but not least, here’s a link to my Actionable Books summary of my favorite book of this year, 15 Commitments of Conscious Leadership. If you’re looking to dig into something that will help you to grow and expand your leadership, this is on my (very) short list.

 

Creating Good Days

Have a good day vector illustration. Chalkboard decorative banner.

In recent months, I’ve been blogging for Actionable Conversations and continuing to write book summaries for Actionable Books. Instead of writing something new for this site, I’ll just tell you a little bit about my most recent posts–and share them with you.

I’m also thrilled to let you know that, in addition to writing for Actionable, I’ve recently become an Actionable Consultant. This allows me to bring a new offer to my clients (and would-be clients) that is a truly innovative way to develop leaders and increase the quality of learning at work. You can learn more about what Actionable offers here–and if you’re interested in learning more–I’d love to talk with you! I’m a huge fan of what Actionable does and hope you will be too!

Now, to my posts:

One of the most exciting books I’ve recently read is How to Have a Good Day by Caroline Webb. The book is an encyclopedia of research that gives us insights into how to make each day better for ourselves and the people around us–especially if we are leaders. I share the bigger idea that really struck me while reading the book here, in my blog post. In short (though I hope you read the whole post)–I argue that having good days, consciously, is possibly the most important thing you can to do create a good, meaningful life.

While I have your attention, here’s a link to the other post I wrote recently, about promises, commitments and accountability. I dig into the work of Fernando Flores and explore the power of promises and requests–and the way we frame them–in this post.

And, if you like these, and want more, take a look at my post, A Medley of Resources, which links to more of my posts for Actionable.

Happy reading!

 

A Medley of Resources

For the past few months I’ve been writing posts for Actionable—the same organization that also creates wonderful (and numerous) book summaries—including twenty or so that I’ve authored. While my original intention was to write posts both here and for Actionable—those posts have ended up being my focus. It’s been wonderful to have an editor and a schedule! So, this post is a placeholder whose purpose is to point you in the direction of the these resources.

Here’s my post about complexity. It expands on what I’ve shared on these pages. Working with complexity is a requirement in a world of VUCA (volatility, uncertainty, complexity and ambiguity.)

And here’s a post that explored polarity management. This is the tool in my toolkit that I find most meaningful these days (and is another way to manage complexity.)

My post about the distinction between assessments (opinions) and assertions (facts) was written on November 10. I really appreciated having an editor with the wisdom to notch it down a bit and still keep it relevant to the unique moment we are in.

Finally, here’s my latest post–one of the most personal and simultaneously most practical I’ve written. It explores the topic of listening–a skill that is at the very core of what effective leaders do. I share a practice that is now becoming a habit for me—which I call “the pause.”

And, here are links to the summaries I’ve written for Actionable Books in the last couple of years. They are listed in the order that they appeared. Kegan’s An Everyone Culture and Laloux’s Reinventing Organizations are particularly provocative. Haber’s Business of Good is inspiring. Duhigg’s new book on productivity and Halvorson’s book on biases continue to shed light on how we can be more effective in our day-to-day lives.